Loading...

Knowledge Base

How to Troubleshoot WordPress Plugins Without Admin Access

Important: This article does not apply to Secure WordPress.

WordPress plugins are essential to extending its capabilities and allowing extensive customization beyond the basic CMS. They add functionalities that WordPress doesn't natively support. However, if a plugin's code becomes outdated, corrupted, overwritten, or malfunctions, it can cause a problem that prevents the WordPress Administrator Panel from loading.

But how do you troubleshoot WordPress plugins without admin access? This guide will equip you with effective strategies to pinpoint the problematic plugin and restore your website's functionality, even without logging into the dashboard. 

In this article, we will discuss: 

Troubleshoot WordPress Plugins Without Admin Access 

An out-of-date or faulty plugin can cause issues with your WordPress® website. Troubleshooting your installed plugins is the only way to determine if your plugins are the issue.

To troubleshoot your plugins, you must first turn them all off. Then, you can turn them back on one at a time and verify the plugin that causes your website not to function normally. If the issue prevents you from using the WordPress Administrator panel, you must complete this process using:

Method 1: Disable WordPress Plugin via FTP

To complete these steps, you must connect to your website with an FTP program.

Using FTP, follow these instructions to turn off your plugins:
  1. Open FileZilla on your device. You need the information below to connect to FileZilla. If you have not created an FTP account for your website, please see How Do I Create an SFTP Account for My WordPress Website? for instructions.
    • Host - Your IP address or server hostname
    • Username - Your FTP username
    • Password - Your FTP password
    • Port - 22 
      Host, Username, Password, and Port fields
  2. Open the website folder that contains your WordPress website. This folder is usually named wordpress1
  3. Open the /wp-content folder.
    wp-content folder
  4. Find the plugins folder, then rename it to plugins.deactivate.
    wp-plugins folder deactivate
  5. Once renamed, log in to the WordPress Administrator panel.
  6. When you log in to the WordPress Administrator panel, your plugins are deactivated. 
  7. In the WordPress Administrator panel, turn on one plugin at a time.
    WordPress Dashboard - Activate Plugins
Note: Test your website after turning on a plugin to make sure it is working correctly. If the issue returns, you know exactly which plugin caused the problem.

Method 2: Disable WordPress Plugin via phpMyAdmin

To complete these steps, you will need to use phpMyAdmin. For more information, please see How Do I Access phpMyAdmin?

Important: Only users with knowledge of how to navigate and make changes to a database using phpMyAdmin should use this method.
  1. Login to your https://www.web.com/my-account/login.
  2. Once logged into your account, click WordPress on the left menu. 
    • If you have more than one WordPress package, click Manage to open your package details.
  3. In the Configuration section, click Database Manager. 
    Account Manager Database Manager
  4. Click the ADMIN button for your WordPress database. This will open phpMyAdmin in another tab.
    Account Manager Database Manager Admin
  5. In the WordPress database, locate the wp_options table.
    phpMyAdmin wp-options
  6. Select the active_plugins option, then change the value to a:0:{}. All plugins will turn off.
    phpMyAdmin deactivate plugins
  7. Once changed, log in to the WordPress Administrator panel.
  8. In the WordPress Administrator panel, turn on one plugin at a time.
    WordPress Dashboard - Activate Plugins
Note: Test your website after turning on a plugin to make sure it is working correctly. If the issue returns, you will know exactly which plugin caused the problem.

Review

Don't let a malfunctioning website and locked admin panel leave you stranded! By following the methods outlined in this guide, you can effectively troubleshoot WordPress plugins without admin access and identify the culprit. Remember, this process requires FTP or phpMyAdmin access, so some technical knowledge is recommended. However, with careful execution, you'll be back in control of your website in no time.

Important Note: This guide is intended for standard WordPress installations. If your website uses additional security measures like Secure WordPress, these methods might not apply. In such cases, consult your security provider for assistance.

Did you find this article helpful?

 
* Your feedback is too short

Loading...